allthemiddlefingers:

lucrezialoveshercesare:

actual Harry Potter

the awkward moment when the actor playing harry potter is a better representation of book harry potter than movie harry potter

(Source: gallifreyfalls, via doctorvaljean)

doriimer:

cardigans + jackets + blazers 

(via penelopegarcla)

robotmango:

gooqueen:

every year after you turn 17 you get further away from being the age of the dancing queen and that’s my least favorite thing about growing up

ah but when you turn 34 you’re two dancing queens and thus having twice the time of your life. and at 51 you become the dancing triumvirate and three golden crowns are forged in your honor

lots to look forward to

(via classycrud)

sirdef:

alduiiin:

sTEPHEN COLBERT

OH MY GOD

sirdef:

alduiiin:

sTEPHEN COLBERT

OH MY GOD

(via doctorvaljean)

thebootygoon:

cant keep ya eyes off my fatty daddy i want u 

image

(na na) 

image

surfbourdt surfboardt 

(Source: microsoftpussy, via eastcoastheartsouthernsoul)

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)
Today’s top book news item:
Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.
Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)

Today’s top book news item:

Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.

Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

(via npr)

motherhensdetective:

I don’t think Maggie Smith is acting in this scene.

(Source: queencersei, via ronaldweasl-y)

spartanrace:

On the eve of the Boston Marathon, we at Spartan Race, along with the country, pay tribute to all the victims and survivors of last year’s attack.
Pictured are athletes and citizens who lived through the events but won’t let tragedy grind them to a halt. This series shot by Robert X. Fogerty for Dear World captures the resilience of those affected that can’t be dampened. Please visit their site to learn more about these people’s stories. 

Boston is as strong as community as the world has. We are proud to be part of it. On Marathon Monday, we will be there. And along with the rest of the world, we will be watching a city recover as one.  

(via martian-maneater)

lookingfromsolitude:

Near the end of his life, Ravi Shankar could express more with a simple melody than others could in an entire concert, writes Douglas Heselgrave in his tribute to the maestro.
Remembering Ravi Shankar (1920 - 2012)
The fading of the ’60s counterculture contributed to a decline in Ravi Shankar’s profile, but also ironically allowed him to develop his music to a higher level. Freed from the expectations of a generation who loved, but largely failed to understand his work, he continued to play around the world and like his long-time friend, the classical violinist Yehudi Menuhin, he was an artist whose work continued to improve as he aged.
Click to read the full article on Paste Magazine

lookingfromsolitude:

Near the end of his life, Ravi Shankar could express more with a simple melody than others could in an entire concert, writes Douglas Heselgrave in his tribute to the maestro.

Remembering Ravi Shankar (1920 - 2012)

The fading of the ’60s counterculture contributed to a decline in Ravi Shankar’s profile, but also ironically allowed him to develop his music to a higher level. Freed from the expectations of a generation who loved, but largely failed to understand his work, he continued to play around the world and like his long-time friend, the classical violinist Yehudi Menuhin, he was an artist whose work continued to improve as he aged.

Click to read the full article on Paste Magazine

(via dvorakoholic)

"No one asked, at any point, if Mitt Romney might give up on his presidential ambitions because he wanted to spend more time with his litter of grandkids. Fuck, no one even asked in 2012 if Tagg Romney would do less on the campaign trail because he just got two new babies. No one asked because not only did no one care, but because everyone assumed that things would go on as normal because that’s what the fuck people do, men, women, grand or otherwise. The only reason anyone is talking about this is because Hillary Clinton has lady parts. And, no matter how you wanna sputter, “But…no,” it comes out sexist."

Mitt Romney Became a Grandfather Eight Times While Running for President and No One Gave a Damn (via samuraifuckingfrog)

(via galaxyclusterfuck)